Home Safety: How to Protect Your Family at Every Stage of Life

By Susanne Dwyer

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

We all want to keep our families as safe as possible, but home safety requirements change as your family grows and evolves. From newborns to pets, a variety of different strategies can ensure your home is as safe and accommodating as possible for your family. Here are some simple tips to help keep your family safe through every stage of life.

Getting Your Home Ready for a New Baby
Babyproofing a home is largely about protecting them from their own curiosity. Once a baby learns to crawl, anything in reach is fair game to be grabbed, touched, or chewed on.

  1. Install baby gates to keep certain rooms off-limits. This is especially important near stairs.
  1. Fill unused electrical outlets with plastic plugs. Outlets are like magnets for babies.
  1. Store breakable items out of reach.
  1. Keep small items out of reach, as well. Small objects that could be put into mouths are a major choking hazard. A good rule of thumb is if it can fit in an empty toilet paper roll, it is small enough for a baby to choke on.

Home Safety for Toddlers and Elementary-Age Children
Toddler-proofing is a little different from babyproofing in that a toddler is usually more resourceful about getting into things they shouldn’t be. Toddlers will climb, open doors and drawers, and generally get themselves into trouble.

  1. Move anything small or breakable up higher now that your child is walking and climbing. You’d be surprised at what they can reach.
  1. If you have a pool, build a fence around it. You’ll want a barrier at least a few feet high to make it harder for your toddler to climb over.
  1. Secure drawers and cabinets with childproof latches.
  1. Place safety locks on windows and doors to prevent them from being opened.
  1. If you don’t have a home security system, install one for added safety. Choosing a system with the right features, like motion sensors and security cameras, can help you know if your curious toddler runs out the door or it can help you keep tabs on things while the babysitter is over.

Safety During the Teenage Years
As your child grows into their teens, the focus moves further from physical safety and more towards online safety and general home security. Online safety is extremely important with teenagers in the house.

  1. Set clear boundaries and expectations with your teen regarding potentially dangerous situations. These could involve simple subjects like safe driving or complex topics like drinking and drugs.
  1. Keep alcohol, firearms, and any prescription or over-the-counter drugs locked up in a safe place.
  1. Educate your teen about safe internet usage. This includes avoiding malware, being smart on social media, and using privacy settings.

Pet-Proofing Your Home
Pets make great additions to the family, but they come with their own safety needs. In many ways, pet-proofing is similar to babyproofing. Pet-proofing involves keeping harmful items out of their reach and making sure that they can’t escape the house or yard and run off.

  1. Keep cleaning products, chemicals, and medications in high places or locked where pets can’t stumble upon them.
  1. If your pet likes to chew on (or eat!) household items, make sure that you don’t leave anything lying around. It can be helpful to do a quick walkthrough of your home a couple times a day, such as when you leave and return from work.
  1. If you have a home security system, make sure the motion sensors are capable of detecting and ignoring your pets.
  1. If you have a fenced yard, check it for weaknesses or small gaps that a pet could squeeze through.

Getting Your Home Ready for Your Parents to Move In
As our parents get older, it’s not uncommon for them to move in with us. This can help ensure their safety and prevent the loneliness that often comes with old age. It can also present some unique challenges when it comes to home safety.

Depending on your parent’s age and their physical and mental well-being, you may need to make small home improvements for their convenience or physical safety. In general, you’ll want to try to minimize the potential for falls and make sure that help is always within reach.

  1. Install grab bars in the bathrooms near the toilet and shower. These bars can help support a person as they move in and out of the shower or tub, both making this task easier and helping prevent falls. Make sure they can support the weight of the person who’ll be using them.
  1. Walk through your home and check for objects that might make tripping hazards. Throw rugs, children’s toys, and pet toys can all be dangerous for people lacking the eyesight or reflexes to maneuver around them easily.
  1. Set up a medical alert system. This is a wearable device that essentially functions as a panic button—if a person falls or has a medical emergency, they can push the button to get instant access to help.
  1. Learn which foods are hazardous for senior health. As your parents age, their immune system weakens, making them more susceptible to food poisoning and health risks. Prepare meals at home that won’t threaten the health of your aging parents.

Your family grows and changes as time goes by, and so should your home safety plans. If you want to keep up with each of your family members, continually assess their needs. These tips should give you a great starting point towards building a safer home for your family.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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From: Home Spun Wisdom

    

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5 Movie Homes in Real Life

By Susanne Dwyer

1_Gone_Girl

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

Movie fans, looking to lurk around some of your favorite film locations? You’re not alone. Stalking cinema hot spots is an obsession for many, and we’re no exception. Below are five iconic movie homes in real life.

Gone Girl’s Missouri New Build

Image Credit: Alexandrea Morrow

Much of 2014’s nail-biting thriller “Gone Girl” (based on the best-selling novel of the same name) took place in this massive Missouri new build. The home used in the film is truly located in Missouri—a Hollywood rarity. The five-bedroom, six-bathroom home stretches over 4,413 square feet and was last estimated at $559,528.

Cher Horowitz’s Mega Mansion

Image Credit: Blogspot

This Los Angeles home has been featured in several Hollywood productions, but in one of its most well-known appearances, it served as the setting for Cher Horowitz’s lux pad in the cult darling “Clueless.” With that famous staircase (perfect for kissing your step brother), seven bedrooms and 10 bathrooms, this private palace is a cinema gem in Encino. The home, currently off-market, has an estimated value of $4,649,217.

Pulp Fiction’s Seedy Drug Den
3_Pulp_Fiction

Image Credit: ItsFilmedThere.com

Quentin Tarantino fans likely remember Lance’s low-lying ranch home in “Pulp Fiction.” Most infamous for the scene in which Lance resuscitates Uma Thurman—er, I mean Mia Wallace—after her drug overdose, this Los Angeles home has two bedrooms, one bathroom, and was most recently valued at $700,318.

The Tenenbaums’ Harlem Home
4_Tenenbaums

Image Credit: Pinterest

Wes Anderson fans can rejoice at the sight of this Harlem townhouse, the location of the Tenenbaums’ family home in his 2001 gem “The Royal Tenenbaums.” With four bathrooms and no listed bedroom count, Anderson and co. apparently rented the home for six months during production. The home is currently valued at $4,286,169.

A Home to Crash a Wedding In
5_Wedding_Crashers

Image Credit: Strawberry Milk

This gorgeous waterfront Maryland property, featured in the 2005 comedy hit “Wedding Crashers,” is actually an inn, so while you can’t live in the home Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn debauched in, you can pay to stay. The Greek Revival, built in 1816, overlooks the Chesapeake Bay and was originally used as a private residence.

*All estimates are based on Zillow at the time of publication.

Zoe Eisenberg is RISMedia’s senior content editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at zoe@rismedia.com.

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From: Consumer News and Advice

    

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How to Avoid High Auto Insurance Premiums

By Susanne Dwyer

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

High insurance premiums are a reality for many consumers, but they needn’t be for all consumers. High premiums are sometimes paid for by consumers who don’t realize they’re paying for them. Other people who overpay have no idea they have the power to lower their premiums using a number of tried and true techniques. It’s not impossible to find lower car insurance premiums, but it’s also not something most people know how to do without a little guidance. These tips can help you avoid paying high premiums, save you money, and make your life just a little more affordable.

Check Your Credit
The most important thing you can do before you sign any insurance contract is check your credit. Most insurance agencies use your credit to determine your risk as a customer. If your score is low, they figure you’re a risky customer. They think you’re more likely to file claims you can’t afford to handle on your own, and they charge you more than they charge other consumers. Now is the time to check your score, figure out if there are any mistakes on it you can fix to help raise it, and then apply for new insurance premiums.

Don’t Drive a Risky Car
It all depends on what you drive if you want to avoid high premiums. You’re going to get the best rates on newer cars that are large and filled with safety features. You’re also going to see better rates on cars that have easy-to-find parts, that hold their value well, and that aren’t sporting big engines that use a lot of power. It’s better to drive a safe car than a sports car.

Know the Crime Rate
There’s not a lot you can do about where you live, but you should know it can affect your premiums. If you’re shopping for a new home, check the crime rate to see if it’s high or low. People who live in areas with a high crime rate pay more. This is because they are more likely to see damage occur to their car in the form of vandalism or theft, and they’re more likely to get into an accident with someone who doesn’t have insurance of their own if the neighborhood isn’t as financially stable as others.

Know What You Need
Cheap auto insurance is entirely possible to have if you know what kind of coverage you need. If you drive a brand-new car, you need a lot more coverage than someone who drives an older car. If you drive a car that’s paid in full, you might not need as much insurance as someone who has a car with a loan on it. It’s all dependent on what you drive and if it’s paid for. Lowering your coverage to complement your needs is a good way to save money and avoid paying high premiums.

Know How to Pay
Did you know you can lower your premiums by allowing your insurance company to automatically debit your fee each month from your bank account? When they feel they’re more likely to get paid, they’re going to offer you a discount. When you pay your premium up front rather than paying monthly, you’re also eligible for bigger discounts. Know what you can save when you pay up front, and you might just avoid a much higher deductible.

Where you live and several other factors all play into what you pay for car insurance, and you should know these things in advance. It’s easier to save money on insurance when you’re aware of what you’re looking for and which factors affect your rates. Ask what discounts you get with your policy, and don’t be surprised when your agent begins listing what you might qualify to receive for being a long-time customer.

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From: Home Spun Wisdom

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
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Survey: Housing Came out on the Other Side—Mortgage Market, Not So Much

By Susanne Dwyer

Most homeowners are content with the current status of the housing market, believing not only that they made a smart choice by owning, but also that conditions in their area have gotten better since the recession, according to the results of a new survey.

Ninety-one percent of homeowners and 83 percent of renters surveyed recently by Digital Risk perceive homeownership as “a good investment,” with 87 percent of homeowners seeing their home’s value hold or rise—some more than 20 percent.

Homeowners believe there is room for improvement, however, when it comes to obtaining a mortgage. Although 75 percent of those surveyed report that they supported “efforts over the past decade to make the mortgage process safer and more consumer-friendly,” just 22 percent of homeowners and 13 percent of renters think progress has been made.

“There’s no question that the housing sector continues to be a major driver of growth and recovery in the U.S. economy,” says Jeff Taylor, co-founder and managing director of Digital Risk. “It’s important to remember how far we’ve come in a decade. The fact that the American Dream of owning a home is once again considered a smart investment suggests the housing market has years of strong performance ahead of it—provided that more borrowers clearly understand the criteria and ‘pathway’ to obtaining a mortgage.”

“It’s no secret that Americans support a healthy housing market with clear rules and procedures,” says Rose Bogan, senior vice president of Governance, Risk and Compliance at Digital Risk. “Still, lenders and borrowers alike recognize that consumer protections can be accomplished in a more straightforward, efficient way. The challenge moving forward is for lenders to smartly use technology and procedures to adapt to shifting regulatory requirements as seamlessly as possible.”

Source: Digital Risk, LLC

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From: Consumer News and Advice

    

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Building a Basement Bathroom on a Budget: 5 Tips to Get You Started

By Susanne Dwyer

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

When you’re ready to finally begin construction on that new basement bath, we have the tips you need to help make it more affordable. Save money on plumbing, fixtures, hardware and more when you shop savvy and plan ahead.

  1. Position Your Basement Bathroom Directly Below Your Upstairs Bath
    If there’s one thing that’s going to blow your budget right away, it’s having to install new drain and water lines on the other side of the house. Play it smart and place your new basement bath just below the one upstairs. This limits the amount of piping your plumber will have to install, making the project easier on your budget.
  1. Install a Drop Ceiling With Acoustic Tiles
    Your new basement bath needs a ceiling, so why not install one that looks great, allows deceptively easy access to water lines and ductwork, and helps deaden the noise from upstairs? You can get all three in one fell swoop when you add a drop ceiling with acoustic panels. Acoustic panels are designed to absorb noise instead of transferring it, which translates into a quieter basement sanctuary. And if you ever need to access your ductwork due to a water pipe leak in the ceiling, it’s an easy chore to remove a ceiling panel and make a quick repair.
  1. Opt for Laminate Flooring
    Hardwood is lovely, and it’ll increase the value of your home when professionally installed, but it’s a no-go in the basement. To get that same warm and cozy appeal, opt for laminate flooring instead. Cold and moisture are two culprits that affect the floor of a basement, but by purchasing a quality laminate floor that’s specially manufactured for basements, you’ll get a sound product that increases the attractiveness and functionality of your space.
  1. Go Vintage
    A cheap, builder’s grade mirror over the sink may not sound impressive, but if you frame it out with molding strips or a vintage mirror frame, you’ll create an upscale appeal. Wall art isn’t the only feature in your new basement bath that will benefit from a little vintage charm. Hit the estate sales and recycle shops for faucets and fixtures, towel racks, sinks, cabinetry, drawer hardware and even your bathtub. Recycled vintage dressers can be converted into console units to hold sinks and plumbing. They’re relatively easy to recondition, and you can customize them to fit the bathroom sink of your dreams. According to HomeAdvisor.com, the cost to add a second bath begins at $3,000, but you can shave dollars off this figure by buying second-hand.
  1. Use Up the Leftovers
    Found a pricey glass tile that you simply must have in the new basement bath? Leave it at the home store. Write down the name and identifying numbers, and search for other people’s leftovers online instead. When other shoppers purchase too much of any product, their overcompensation can be your savings—especially if the item was custom-made.

A basement bath is a huge convenience for homeowners who intend to use their basements for more than just storage. Whether you’ve already finished your basement or it’s next on your list of things to do, these tips will help you cut expenses when it comes time to build out the bath.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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From: Home Spun Wisdom

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Apartment-Hoppers: Stay Put and Save

By Susanne Dwyer

Zillow_Rent_Savings

Renters can save thousands of dollars by renewing a lease instead of moving to a new rental, according to a recently released analysis by Zillow—a golden opportunity to put savings toward a down payment on a home.

Researchers arrived at an average $3,946 in savings by assessing the most recent rent data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Their findings reveal that the market rate rent rose more than the rent for a tenant who remained in the same rental for five years or more: 5.6 percent versus 3.6 percent between 2014 and 2015.

The savings depend largely on location:

“Renters have a decision to make almost every year—do they stay in the same place, or should they look for a new unit?” says Dr. Svenja Gudell, chief economist at Zillow. “With the country in the middle of an affordability crisis, it’s important for renters to understand how much they can save if they renew their lease instead of finding a new rental. Nationally, rental rates have slowed and the savings from renewing are not as significant for renters today; however, in some of the hottest rental markets, where rents are still rising aggressively, continually renewing a lease can mean saving thousands of dollars.”

For more information, please visit www.zillow.com.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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From: Consumer News and Advice

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Your Move Simplified: The 9 Best Apps for Moving

By Susanne Dwyer

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

It’s no secret that moving is a headache. You need to purchase packing supplies, change your address, clean your current home, and more. Luckily, technology can make the process less painful. Whether you’re choosing the best mover or expertly packing your belongings, there’s an app for it. Read on for useful apps to help you streamline your moving process.

Unpakt
Book, manage, and pay for your move all within the Unpakt app. No need to fill out multiple request forms or call different movers for quotes. Simply enter your move details into the app to see moving prices in several cities across 37 states.

Hire a mover via Unpakt online or on iOS and Android.

TaskRabbit
Get your home or apartment ready for the move by hiring a Tasker to complete home repairs, deep clean your home, and disassemble your bed frame. Services are available in most major cities.

Get your chores done with TaskRabbit on iOS and Android.

MagicPlan
Take pictures of your new home or apartment before your move and use them to create detailed floor plans with MagicPlan. These floor plans allow you to view your space in 3D, decide where to put your couch, and plan DIY projects.

Visualize your space with MagicPlan on iOS and Android.

Wunderlist
Plan your move with Wunderlist, a to-do list web app. Create lists, set deadlines, schedule reminders, and share your list with friends and family helping you move. You can also assign tasks to people you’ve shared your to-do list with.

Make your to-do list online with Wunderlist.

Sortly
Pack with the help of Sortly, a digital organizer. Use the app to take inventory of what you packed in each box so you know where to find your wine opener, your favorite jeans, or your drill. With the premium account, you can create QR code labels for your boxes, access your account online, and export your lists via PDF and Dropbox.

Pack like a pro with Sortly on iOS.

Internet Speed Need Tool
Determine your ideal internet speed with this web app. The tool also shows internet providers in your area that offer your recommended speed—helpful if you’re moving to a new area. The internet speed you need will vary depending on how you use the internet. You may need faster speeds if your kids play video games, if you recently upgraded to a smart TV, or if you run an online business from home.

Determine the speed you need online with the Internet Speed Need Tool.

Postmates
Order late-night meals, cleaning supplies, basic toiletries, or lunch from virtually any store or restaurant in your city. Postmates will deliver the best your city has to offer right to your doorstep—saving you a trip while you’re busy unpacking. Postmates is available in over 200 cities.

Start receiving deliveries through Postmates on iOS and Android.

Nextdoor
Socialize with your new neighbors on Nextdoor, a private social networking app that over 145,000 neighborhoods use to stay connected. Find a babysitter, learn about a rash of car break-ins, and hear about neighborhood events all in one place.

Meet your neighbors through Nextdoor online or on iOS and Android.

Thumbtack
Hire house cleaners, interior designers, carpet cleaners, painters, home security companies, and more, with Thumbtack. Find professionals—in all 50 states—for anything you need in your new home or apartment.

Hire a professional via Thumbtack online or on iOS and Android.

While these apps might not make moving completely pain-free, they can help you get your home ready to move, hire the best mover, and find services in your new neighborhood. Whether you’re moving down the street or across the country, technology can help you save time, money and energy.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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From: Remax Real Estate Advice

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
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Hi, My Name Is…Owner of a Valuable Home

By Susanne Dwyer

Zillow_Household_Name_Chart

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

Call it a household name.

A new analysis from Zillow finds a home owned by a person named Alison or Stuart is likely to be worth roughly two-thirds more than the typical home in the U.S.—for both of them, that equates to over $332,000. The link varies based on location, with some names suited more to one region than others given sociocultural influences.

Ali and Stu are joined by the likes of Anne, Geoffrey, Marina and Peter, to (ahem) name a few, but conventionally female names overtake conventionally male names by a wide margin. The names tied to the most valuable homes also have homes with more living space, generally upwards of 1,550 square feet.

Image Credit: Zillow

At first glance, the names boasting the most valuable homes in each state are common: Janes, Jills and Julies, plus a Martha for good measure. Look again, though—homeowners named Suzanne tend to have the most valuable homes in not one, but two states. Suzanne!

Image Credit: Tenor

Nevermind that home values in Georgia are relatively lower than those in other housing markets. Nevermind that Nevada was ground zero for the collapse. Two states. Two states!

I know what you’re thinking—I thought of it, too:

Note: Zillow’s got everyone covered with a neat tool matching virtually every name ever given with homeownership-related data. Select yours to see the stats!

For more information, please visit www.zillow.com.

Suzanne De Vita is RISMedia’s online news editor. Email her your real estate news ideas at sdevita@rismedia.com.

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From: Consumer News and Advice

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Modifying Your House for Disabled Accessibility Without Compromising Home Value

By Susanne Dwyer

Editor’s Note: This was originally published on RISMedia’s blog, Housecall. See what else is cookin’ now at blog.rismedia.com:

While daily life can be challenging with a disability, innovations over the last few decades have made a new level of independence possible for the disabled. Services and products now make it possible for such individuals to attend school, run daily errands, and live in private homes in ever increasing numbers. Being able to live independently also prevents depression, increases lifespans, and can even improve some conditions.

While this stay at home movement offers many benefits to the disabled and elderly, it is not without its costs. Extensive modifications and renovations often have to be made to homes to accommodate disabled residents. Some of these renovations are fairly un-intrusive (such as intercom and camera systems), but some accommodations require major renovations, such as the installation of chair lifts or elevators. If a homeowner considering such renovations is disabled, any associated costs are often accepted as part of the price of independent living. But what about a scenario in which a disabled individual resides in but doesn’t own a private home? This could be costly for a homeowner in more ways than one.

Disabled-friendly renovations to a home can be expensive in a couple of ways. There is the cost of the renovations themselves, which can be an ongoing process. They can limit a home’s functionality and visual appeal for potential buyers, as well. On the other hand, there are a number of cost-effective resources and techniques that both allow these renovations to be made and make a home appealing to both disabled and able-bodied residents.

What Does Adapting a Home for the Disabled Involve?
Adaptations of this type to private homes vary greatly depending on conditions of disability, and it’s possible that these adaptations may have to change over time, just as disabilities do. The vast majority of disability adaptations that are installed in private homes are considered minor ones. This means that they are relatively inexpensive to install, relatively easy to uninstall, and don’t lessen the value of the home in question. Examples of this type of adaptation include:

  • Installing portable ramps
  • Lowering stair railings
  • Physically rearranging interior and exterior areas for easier access
  • Lowering the heights of doorknobs, window latches and light switches to be accessed by wheelchair users
  • Adding or relocating interior and exterior lighting
  • Installing cameras, intercom systems, and adapted telephones
  • Installing modified latches and lock systems to accommodate those who have difficulty using their hands, such as arthritis sufferers
  • Installing lower storage areas in kitchens
  • Installing lever faucets in both kitchens and bathrooms
  • Installing no-slip flooring, grip bars and shower chairs in bathrooms

These types of changes often cost under $1,000 and generally can be done by amateurs. These alterations also don’t cause issues that can affect home values. Adaptations that are considered major alterations to a home include:

  • Installation of elevators
  • Installation of chair lifts on stairs
  • Installation of ramping floors
  • New plumbing in kitchens and bathrooms, including lower sinks, showers and bathtubs and higher toilets
  • Accessible kitchens
  • Adding accessible rooms to house

These types of changes generally cost well over $1,000. Unless homeowners possess various renovation skills, they should be made by professional contractors.

Once such changes are made, they generally become a permanent part of the house. If such changes could limit future use by new owners, this could affect a home’s value.

Saving Money and a Home’s Value When Making Adaptations
Many individuals are unaware that federal grants are available for home modifications to assist the elderly and disabled. These modifications are also deductible at tax time. Such monies can certainly help to defray the cost of adaptations, even minor ones.

Sustaining a home’s worth is probably not uppermost in a homeowner’s thoughts when making changes to accommodate a disabled relative, but making intelligent and thoughtful changes when doing so can help to preserve home value. These include:

  1. Not making permanent changes that impair or interfere with the house’s basic functioning—in other words, the house should continue to be comfortable and accessible to all who use it, regardless of ability levels; and
  1. Going with the professionals—yes, that internet video made dismembering your house look like a snap, but unless you truly have the time and skills needed for major renovations, paying a professional contractor now will save you and future occupants much money and heartbreak later.

Given our aging population, a professionally adapted house done now could be much more in-demand in years to come.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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From: Home Spun Wisdom

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Ask the Expert: What Advice Do You Have for Homebuyers Forgoing a Home Inspection?

By Susanne Dwyer

Today’s Ask the Expert column features Dan Steward, president of Pillar To Post Home Inspectors.

Q: What advice do you have for those thinking of buying a home without waiting for a home inspection?

A: As housing markets continue to heat up, many buyers are forgoing the important step of getting a home inspection. While this isn’t a widespread phenomenon, it can easily occur when a particular market heats up. In fact, when a market gets hot, buyers are afraid that if they put in an offer contingent on the outcome of a home inspection, they may lose the home to others who are willing to take the risk of buying the home without that contingency.

While some have been able to dodge the bullet, others have purchased homes without inspections, only to find that there are thousands of dollars in repairs needed.

In fact, a recent home inspection revealed a crack in the cement floor of a garage attached to a home. While the crack appeared to be tiny, the home inspector later revealed that it was there as a result of a giant oak tree next to the garage. The roots were so huge that the floor would eventually be broken by the tree’s growth. By removing the tree, the cost was only a few hundred dollars; however, the inspector noted that five years down the road, the entire garage floor would have needed to be jackhammered and replaced, costing thousands.

Understanding the importance of home inspections, many of our franchisees offer an immediate post-closing inspection for the sake of catching items that, while small at the moment, can grow into something very large and costly.

For more information, please visit www.pillartopost.com.

For the latest real estate news and trends, bookmark RISMedia.com.

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From: Consumer News and Advice

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893