Houston-area garden events

By By Kathy Huber TUESDAYS-SUNDAYS
The Mercer Society Gift and Plant Shoppe: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays at 400 Main, Old Town Spring; 281-651-5475, themercersociety.org/ways-to-give/donate. Sales proceeds benefit flood-damaged Mercer Botanic Gardens.
t: Patty Allen, 281-441-8646
SATURDAY, JULY 7
Cactus and Succulent Class: with Jim Maas and Pat Cordray. 10 a.m. at Maas Nursery, 5511 Todville Road, Seabrook; 281-474-2488, maasnursery.com. $40.
Butterfly Gardening: 10 a.m. at Buchanan’s Native Plants, 611 E. 11th; 713-861-5702, register at buchanansplants.com. Free.
Insiders’ Tour at Peckerwood Garden: 10 a.m. at Peckerwood Garden, 20559 FM 359, Hempstead; 979-826-3232; register at peckerwoodgarden.org.

From: Gardening

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Homeowners still recovering from Harvey become do-it-yourselfers

By By Diane Cowen If you think Houston has put itself together and moved forward, look again. Between a shortage of labor and a shortage of cash, thousands of homeowners affected by Hurricane Harvey’s flood waters are still recovering.Those with money or insurance checks grabbed available contractors and resources. But of the estimated 170,000 flooded homes, some 80 percent of them were not covered by flood insurance. FEMA checks covered just a fraction of repair costs.Faced with five- and six-figure contractor bids, many have become do-it-yourselfers. They had no choice but to learn to hang drywall, lay tile and handle other construction tasks. And their work is still under way.

From: Gardening

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

April calendar of gardening events

By By Kathy Huber TUESDAYS-
SUNDAYS
The Mercer Society Gift and Plant Shoppe
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays at 400 Main, Old Town Spring; 281-651-5475, themercersociety.org/ways-to-give/donate. Sales proceeds benefit flood-damaged Mercer Botanic Gardens.
SATURDAY
Brazoria County Master Gardeners’ 20th Annual Spring Plant Sale
8 a.m.-noon at Brazoria County Environmental Education Station, 799 E. Hospital, Angleton; brazoria.agrilife.org. Free.
Educational Classes
Session 1: Gardening in the Shade: 8-10 a.m. Session 2: Herbs! 10:30-12:30 p.m. at Montgomery County Master Gardeners, 9020 Airport, Conroe; mcmga.com, 936-539-7824, $5 per session or $8 for both.

From: Gardening

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Keep plumerias indoors until Easter to avoid threat of freeze

By By Kathy Huber Q: When should I move my plumerias back outside?
Joe Peddy, Houston
A: In around Thanksgiving and out around Easter was the motto of Eulas and Lake Stafford, the late plumeria experts who generously shared their advice with area gardeners. Of course, first check the forecast. It’s best to move plumerias indoors for winter storage when night temperatures drop below 50 degrees, often around the fall holiday. Return the tropical plants to fresh air and encourage them out of dormancy when spring nights remain 50 degrees and warmer.
The long-range forecast shows no freezes, and day and night temperatures look promising as we near Easter on April 1.
Q: I’ve seen blueberries in some local nurseries.

From: Gardening

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893

Don't murder the crape myrtles when pruning

By By Kathy Huber Q: It pains me to see so many crape myrtles chopped down to ugly stubs. I see it everywhere, with properly pruned myrtles almost outnumbered by crape “murdered” trees. Will you provide pruning advice?
Betty Pritchett, Houston
A: The annual “crape myrtle murder” discussion has begun, so here are guidelines to prune these low-maintenance flowering trees.
Crapes do not need to be pruned to bloom. However, a tree can benefit from late-winter pruning to remove dead, weak or crossing branches and suckers at the base. But avoid mutilation.
Trim to maintain or restore a natural shape. Remove branches 2 inches or less in diameter, if necessary. Don’t top the trees.

From: Gardening

    

Remember I am just a phone call away to help with all of your real estate needs!

Nancy Wey
281-455-2893